Untitled
talesofwar:

Some jokes never get old, don’t they ?

talesofwar:

Some jokes never get old, don’t they ?

thecivilwarparlor:

"Oh, no, mix them up. I am tired of state’s rights."

-Maj. Gen. George Thomas in response to the question of whether to bury the Confederate dead according to state.

Casualties for the Union Army during the Battles for Chattanooga (Orchard Knob, Lookout Mountain, and Missionary Ridge) amounted to 5,824 (753 killed, 4,722 wounded, and 349 missing) of about 56,000 engaged; Confederate casualties were 6,667 (361 killed, 2,160 wounded, and 4,146 missing, mostly prisoners) of about 44,000. Southern losses may have been higher; Grant claimed 6,142 prisoners. In addition, the Union Army seized 40 cannons and 69 limbers and caissons. When a chaplain asked General Thomas whether the dead should be sorted and buried by state, Thomas replied “Mix ‘em up. I’m tired of states’ rights.”

Eicher, David J. The Longest Night: A Military History of the Civil War. New York: Simon & Schuster, 2001 page 613

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Battle_of_Missionary_Ridge


One of my favorite Civil War characters.

thecivilwarparlor:

"Oh, no, mix them up. I am tired of state’s rights."
-Maj. Gen. George Thomas in response to the question of whether to bury the Confederate dead according to state.
Casualties for the Union Army during the Battles for Chattanooga (Orchard Knob, Lookout Mountain, and Missionary Ridge) amounted to 5,824 (753 killed, 4,722 wounded, and 349 missing) of about 56,000 engaged; Confederate casualties were 6,667 (361 killed, 2,160 wounded, and 4,146 missing, mostly prisoners) of about 44,000. Southern losses may have been higher; Grant claimed 6,142 prisoners. In addition, the Union Army seized 40 cannons and 69 limbers and caissons. When a chaplain asked General Thomas whether the dead should be sorted and buried by state, Thomas replied “Mix ‘em up. I’m tired of states’ rights.”
Eicher, David J. The Longest Night: A Military History of the Civil War. New York: Simon & Schuster, 2001 page 613

One of my favorite Civil War characters.

thecivilwarparlor:

POST CIVIL WAR FOOD- BISCUITS AND GRAVY - 
THE BISCUIT - DIED OUT IN ENGLAND- PRESERVED IN AMERICA
The dish gained regional distinction after the Civil War when food was in short supply.  Sawmill crews in Appalachian logging camps often survived on little more than coffee, biscuits and cream gravy—hence the popular term “sawmill gravy.” 
The biscuit emerged as a distinct food type in the early 19th century, before the American Civil War. Cooks created a cheap to produce addition for their meals that required no yeast, which was expensive and difficult to store.
Soft biscuits are common to Scotland and Guernsey and that the term biscuit as applied to a soft product was retained in these places, and in America, whereas in England it has completely died out…
Confederate Biscuits
2 cups flour
2 teaspoons baking powder
¼ teaspoon baking powder
1 teaspoon salt
6 tablespoons shortening
2/3 cup buttermilk
Sift together flour, baking powder, baking soda and salt. Cut in shortening until mixture is the consistency of meal. Stir in buttermilk. Form mixture into a ball; place on a floured surface and knead a few times. Pat out to about 1/4-inch thick. Cut with a small biscuit cutter. Place on an ungreased baking sheet and bake at 450 degrees for 8 to 10 minutes. Cut open and spread with a little butter.
http://www.ora.tv/brownbagwinetasting/article/alton-browns-ma-mays-biscuits—gravy-recipe
http://www.nytimes.com/2011/09/21/nyregion/recipes-adapted-from-cookbooks-of-the-civil-war-era.html?_r=0
Information from http://www.jacksonfreepress.com/news/2011/apr/06/its-all-gravy/

thecivilwarparlor:

POST CIVIL WAR FOOD- BISCUITS AND GRAVY -

THE BISCUIT - DIED OUT IN ENGLAND- PRESERVED IN AMERICA

The dish gained regional distinction after the Civil War when food was in short supply.  Sawmill crews in Appalachian logging camps often survived on little more than coffee, biscuits and cream gravy—hence the popular term “sawmill gravy.” 

The biscuit emerged as a distinct food type in the early 19th century, before the American Civil War. Cooks created a cheap to produce addition for their meals that required no yeast, which was expensive and difficult to store.

Soft biscuits are common to Scotland and Guernsey and that the term biscuit as applied to a soft product was retained in these places, and in America, whereas in England it has completely died out…

Confederate Biscuits

2 cups flour

2 teaspoons baking powder

¼ teaspoon baking powder

1 teaspoon salt

6 tablespoons shortening

2/3 cup buttermilk

Sift together flour, baking powder, baking soda and salt. Cut in shortening until mixture is the consistency of meal. Stir in buttermilk. Form mixture into a ball; place on a floured surface and knead a few times. Pat out to about 1/4-inch thick. Cut with a small biscuit cutter. Place on an ungreased baking sheet and bake at 450 degrees for 8 to 10 minutes. Cut open and spread with a little butter.

http://www.ora.tv/brownbagwinetasting/article/alton-browns-ma-mays-biscuits—gravy-recipe

http://www.nytimes.com/2011/09/21/nyregion/recipes-adapted-from-cookbooks-of-the-civil-war-era.html?_r=0

Information from http://www.jacksonfreepress.com/news/2011/apr/06/its-all-gravy/

On a quiet evening you can almost hear the Ents move around…

On a quiet evening you can almost hear the Ents move around…

Minions of the Tomato King